During the pandemic, the river calls to a new generation of fishers

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FIRST FISH on the LA River for L.A. Times reporter Lila Seidman. We had a blast on the water. (Courtesy Lila Seidman)

 

From the Los Angeles Times: Despite its concrete casing, installed in the late 1930s to rein in once-frequent flooding, signs of the natural river persist. Besides birds of many feathers, it’s home to beefy carp, small-mouth bass, tilapia and — once upon a time — steelhead trout. If you tilt your gaze in just the right way, away from the overpasses and concrete shores, it could be Georgia.

There are grander digs to fish — rushing rivers with glittering trout in Mammoth Lakes and Kern County — but they lack one of the L.A. River’s greatest strengths: convenience.

Read the whole story here (paywall). 

Help BLM select an Alabama Hills plan

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Movie Magic: The Alabama Hills outside of Lone Pine, California, encompass more than 29,000 acres of public land that is well known for its mix of scenic, cultural, geological, educational, biological, historical, recreational, cinematographic and scientific values. (Courtesy Friends of the Inyo)

BISHOP, California. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Bishop Field Office is seeking public input for the future management of the Alabama Hills near Lone Pine in Inyo County. Today’s release of an environmental assessment lays out three proposed alternatives and begins a 30-day public review period that ends on August 7, 2020.

Set between the jagged peaks of the Sierra Nevada and the Owens Valley, the Alabama Hills are a unique formation of rounded rocks and eroded hills that encompass more than 29,000 acres of public land that is well known for its mix of scenic, cultural, geological, educational, biological, historical, recreational, cinematographic, and scientific values. In March 2019, President Trump signed Public Law 116-9 (P.L. 116-9), also known as the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, which designated 18,745 acres within the Alabama Hills as a National Scenic Area. The BLM is currently preparing a management plan for the Scenic Area and adjacent public lands in the Alabama Hills Special Recreation Management Area.

Implementing P.L. 116-9 is a top priority for the Department of the Interior as we work to strike a proper balance for land and resource management, increase access for hunting, fishing, and recreation, and create economic prosperity, while protecting and preserving America’s treasures.

“We welcome continued public engagement in our effort to develop a comprehensive plan for management of the area,” says Bishop Field Manager Steve Nelson. “We also look forward to completing the plan and working with the Alabama Hills Stewardship Group, the local tribe, and the Lone Pine community to implement management strategies that will ensure the long-term protection, conservation, public access, and responsible use of this magnificent landscape.”

Written comments on the proposed alternatives in the environmental assessment can be submitted via email to: blm_ca_alabama_hills_planning@blm.gov; by fax: 760-872-5055; or by mail to: BLM Bishop Field Office, Attn: Alabama Hills Management Plan, 351 Pacu Lane, Suite 100, Bishop, CA 93514.

Before including addresses, phone numbers, email addresses or other personal identifying information in a comment, commenters should be aware that the entire comment, including personal identifying information, could be made publicly available at any time. While the public may ask the BLM to withhold personal identifying information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that it will be able to do so.

For specific questions, please call Project Manager Monica Buhler at (760) 872-5000.

Check out the management alternatives here.

Fly fishing goes boom

From the Washington Post:

It’s not very often that anyone compares a Brad Pitt movie to a worldwide pandemic, but that’s what’s happening in the world of fly-fishing. While other businesses try to dig themselves out from the damaging effects of the novel coronavirus and quarantine, many fly-fishing shops across the country are noticing a different trend: Business is booming.

“We’ve been doing this for 160 years, and the last time we saw a push this big was when Brad Pitt made ‘A River Runs Through It,’ ” says Simon Perkins, the newly appointed president of fly-fishing giant Orvis. The movie was based on the book of the same name by Norman Maclean.

Not a big ‘ask’ from Angeles National Forest

moek says:

your asking the wrong people. forest ranger patrick everyday does his part to clean the park . problem is the people are animals with no courtesy. not enough of authority up there its sad i know. but people need to take reposnisbility.

Pistoff Fly Fisherman says:

I was just there today. It looks as if there was an air drop of trash all along the west fork of the San Gabriel River. I’d love to say that it’s just an issue of blocked and/or overflowing dumpsters, but it’s clear there wasn’t even an attempt to get the trash to a receptacle in most cases. I could’ve filled a couple dumpsters just within the first mile of the footbridge – and that doesn’t include what was strewn all around the dumpsters. Between the litter and the tagging (in broad daylight!), I wish they’d stand watch and ticket the living piss out of these jerks. We could wipe out the state deficit with one June weekend.

John P Tobin

June 10 at 1:11 PM  · Shared with Members of Pasadena Casting Club - the Virtual Fly Fishing Lodge

Here is a status report from the Fisheries Resource Volunteer Corps president, Dave Baumgartner on the Angeles Forest and the trash.

Rec zones set to reopen (*some restrictions apply)

Poet and river visionary Lewis McAdams would have been proud to see the next generation of river stewardship unfold. (Jim Burns)

Given the state of everything, I didn’t think that the rec zones, in Elysian Park and the Sepulveda Basin, would open, but I was happily wrong. It’s become a tradition since 2013 to have actual legal fishing (don’t forget your license), bird watching, jail-breaking the pooch, or just hanging out in these two designated areas, from Memorial Day until Sept. 30. This year, because of the pandemic, watch for posted public health guidelines. Know that kayaking is not in the cards this year.

We’ll miss two figures along the water this year, Friends of the Los Angeles River co-founder Lewis MacAdams, and river

Lewis MacAdams by his beloved Los Angeles River.

champion extraordinaire, passed away just over a month ago. Tip your hat to his statue what was Marsh Park and is now named after him. Without Lewis, none of us would be enjoying the water the way we now can.

And we won’t see the friendly smile of veteran L.A. Park Ranger Capt. Alberto Torres, who spent 40 years on the job, in various positions. Alberto defined public service for me, with his kindly manner and sense of humor.

If you love fishing, there is no better way than to celebrate easing the restrictions of the last two months, than to hang out on the banks of our very own river. Maybe I can even catch a carp, if I can remember how to start my car to get there.

See you on the river, Jim Burns