Posts by Jim Burns

Calendar Item: Come join me Thursday night at the Pasadena Casting Club

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Yucking it up in 1938: Herald-Express photographer Coy Watson Jr. (left) and reporter Fred Eldridge (Courtesy KCET).

 

Hello everyone,

I’m speaking this week about the critical juncture in the story of the LA River, the time we’re in right now.  So get your inner river nerd on this Thursday, Sept 13, at 7:30 p.m., at the Pasadena Casting Club in Pasadena’s beautiful Lower Arroyo Seco. If you haven’t seen the casting pond, check it out. The event is  free and you don’t have to be a PCC member to attend. No reservation required. Here are directions. Note, the clubhouse doesn’t have an address.

See you on the river, Jim Burns

 

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Calendar Item: TU cleanup at Bowtie set for Sept. 15

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Greetings Fisherfolks!

I wanted to invite you all to join in cleaning up our local fishing spot, the Bowtie Parcel at the LA River State Park. We’re working in conjunction with Heal the Bay to clean up our local waterways and we need help in conserving our own local spots. We’ll be gathering at the Bowtie Parcel at 9 a.m. on Saturday, September 15th and we’ll provide the stuff necessary to get it done. Bring a friend with you, and please sign up for the cleanup on eventbrite – the same place we all signed up for our fishing days.

As an added bonus we’ll get there early on the 15th and go fishing! So if you want to sharpen your skills and enjoy a day on the water bring your fishing poles and we’ll have some fun.

See you on the river,

Bob Blankenship

See below for details and RSVP on eventbrite.com.

Register on Eventbrite.com, scroll down to LA River Bowtie State Park
What to bring to the cleanup:
Make sure you have signed a liability waiver. Without a signed liability waiver, you can not participate in the cleanup

We recommend bringing your own gloves (we will have one per person at the site)
Sunscreen
Bottle for water
Bucket for recyclable items
What is Recyclable?
YES: Glass, aluminum cans, tin cans, plastic drinking bottles.
NO: Everything else! (paper, plastic wrappers, Styrofoam, dirty items, etc.)

Quick mends: Extreme heat suspected in Malibu fish die-off

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More than 1,000 fish died in Malibu Lagoon last week from what scientists suspect was higher-than-average water temperature. (Courtesy #follownews)

More than 1,000 fish, mostly mullets, were discovered last week floating dead in Malibu Lagoon, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Fish die-offs have been widely reported this summer in Florida and the Gulf Coast due to a persistent red algae bloom. Our own die-off in Malibu Lagoon occurred because of  high-than-average water temperatures, at least that’s the suspicion of state park scientists.

Scientists also blame hotter-than-average ocean temperatures for the Southland’s muggy conditions this summer. Temperatures have been recorded around 80 degrees F.

See you on the river, Jim Burns

 

Calendar Item: Native fish in the LA River

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Despite all the talk about revitalization and restoration of the Los Angeles River, native fish have often been forgotten, yet they are critical to the long-term health and resilience of the river.

The Native Fish in the Los Angeles River Forum, to be held at the Los Angeles River Center on Wednesday, Aug. 29 from 4-6 p.m., will focus on the status of native fish in the Los Angeles River and on some interesting work going on to protect and restore them.

Featured presenters include:

  • Nathan Holste — U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

    Nathan Holste has been studying the Los Angeles River to determine if ecosystem services can be improved in order to foster native fish as an integral part of urban stream restoration projects. He will report on the status of his study, which includes concepts for redesigning the riverbed and 2D hydraulic modeling results.

  • Mark Capelli — National Marine Fisheries Service

    Mark Capelli has served with the National Marine Fisheries Service, since 2000 as the Steelhead Recovery Coordinator for South-Central and Southern California. He is the lead author for both the Southern California and South-Central California Steelhead Recovery Plans.

  • Wendy Katagi — Stillwater Sciences

    Wendy Katagi, Senior Manager, Watershed and Ecosystem Restoration Services for Stillwater Sciences, will moderate the discussion. Wendy has participated in many of the most important fish recovery programs in Southern California.

  • A. J. Keith — Stillwater Sciences

    A. J. Keith, Senior Aquatic Ecologist with Stillwater Sciences, will report on work Stillwater is doing with various partners, including the Arroyo Seco Foundation, for native fish recovery in the LA River system.

    • Scott Cher — Arroyo Seco Foundation

      Scott Cher will discuss ASF’s Rainbow Trout Restoration program and native fish recovery in the Arroyo Seco.

    Presenters will participate in a panel discussion featuring questions and answers from the audience. The program will last from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. with light refreshments following the presentations and discussion. It is directed to LA River activists, organizations and agencies. The goal of the event is to focus more attention on native fish and habitat restoration as part of the LA River program and the importance of the tributaries such as Tujunga Canyon and the Arroyo Seco to restoring the health of the river ecosystem.

Get Tickets

Arroyo Seco Foundation, 570 W. Avenue 26 #450, Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 405-7326

Quick mends: Network of cameras capture LA River’s wildlife

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A coyote stands on its hind legs, captured by a new wildlife camera installed by the National Park Service near Silver Lake. | National Park Service/Public Domain

According to KCET, National Park Service researchers have installed a series wildlife cameras across 30 miles of the river’s course to try and get answers on how foxes, bobcats, opossums, coyotes, skunks, raccoons and other mammals use the area.

Around 30 cameras have been installed this year, from relatively wild areas in Griffith Park to little strips of property right outside of downtown L.A. that could be as small as 10×20 feet. The program will hopefully help determine whether the LA River acts as a wildlife corridor between the more than 150,000-acre Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area and spaces in the city.

Eventually, the public can help tag photos by going on a citizen science website.

See you on the river, Jim Burns

Oh, snap: CalTrout opens annual photo contest

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The 2018 California Trout Photo Contest is now accepting submissions July 15 through Aug. 31! Share your best photos of California’s rivers, streams and creeks and your angling experiences. Photos can include fish, anglers or others enjoying California waters or be more scenic in nature. Enter today for a chance to win some great gear and be featured on the CalTrout website, social media channels and in issues of The Current.

Eleven winners total will be selected. One Grand Prize Winner, one People’s Choice Award and nine Best Photo winners.

Need some inspiration? Check out last year’s winning photos here.

Prizes awarded:

GRAND PRIZE – 1 Winner
Photo featured on home page of CalTrout website, one-year CalTrout membership, Sage Foundation rod and 2200 Series reel with 20 lb. Rio line ($575 value).
PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD – 1 Winner
Photo featured on home page of CalTrout website, one-year CalTrout membership, CalTrout embroidered Patagonia Refugio backpack, CalTrout neck gaitor, and Echo Carbon XL rod ($300 value).
BEST PHOTOS – Nine Winners
Photo included on Caltrout.org photo contest page, one-year CalTrout membership, Set of CalTrout native fish pint glasses and playing cards, and CalTrout trucker hat ($115 value).
Contest Rules and Guidelines:

Once the submission period has ended, CalTrout will select 25 finalists. From those finalists, our members and social media followers will vote to determine the People’s Choice Award winner and 9 Best Photo winners. CalTrout judges will select the Grand Prize winner.

Judging Criteria: Photos will be judged on how well they depict the spirit of California waters and/or the sport of fly-fishing as well as overall artistic merit (lighting, color, composition, etc).

All photos must in some way be related to California rivers, creeks or streams and the activities around them. Ideally, photos should have a horizontal format.

Maximum number of entries: Ten per individual.

All submissions must be submitted using the contest online entry form. (This will be available when the submission period begins on July 17.)

Photographs must be in digital format.

Only online entries will be eligible. No print or film submissions will be accepted.

The photograph need not be taken with a digital camera; scans of negatives, transparencies, or photographic prints are acceptable.

Digital files must be high resolution, 300ppi, file size 3MB or larger (at close to actual size) and must be in .jpg format.

All entries must be received by midnight PST, Aug. 31, 2018.

If a person is in the photo, you must submit a signed model release for each person depicted in the image.

Please read our Full Contest Rules before entering. If you have further questions please email photos@caltrout.org. Photos must be submitted using our online form. Photos emailed to photos@caltrout.org will not be considered.

SUBMIT PHOTOS