Calendar Item: Native fish in the LA River

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Despite all the talk about revitalization and restoration of the Los Angeles River, native fish have often been forgotten, yet they are critical to the long-term health and resilience of the river.

The Native Fish in the Los Angeles River Forum, to be held at the Los Angeles River Center on Wednesday, Aug. 29 from 4-6 p.m., will focus on the status of native fish in the Los Angeles River and on some interesting work going on to protect and restore them.

Featured presenters include:

  • Nathan Holste — U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

    Nathan Holste has been studying the Los Angeles River to determine if ecosystem services can be improved in order to foster native fish as an integral part of urban stream restoration projects. He will report on the status of his study, which includes concepts for redesigning the riverbed and 2D hydraulic modeling results.

  • Mark Capelli — National Marine Fisheries Service

    Mark Capelli has served with the National Marine Fisheries Service, since 2000 as the Steelhead Recovery Coordinator for South-Central and Southern California. He is the lead author for both the Southern California and South-Central California Steelhead Recovery Plans.

  • Wendy Katagi — Stillwater Sciences

    Wendy Katagi, Senior Manager, Watershed and Ecosystem Restoration Services for Stillwater Sciences, will moderate the discussion. Wendy has participated in many of the most important fish recovery programs in Southern California.

  • A. J. Keith — Stillwater Sciences

    A. J. Keith, Senior Aquatic Ecologist with Stillwater Sciences, will report on work Stillwater is doing with various partners, including the Arroyo Seco Foundation, for native fish recovery in the LA River system.

    • Scott Cher — Arroyo Seco Foundation

      Scott Cher will discuss ASF’s Rainbow Trout Restoration program and native fish recovery in the Arroyo Seco.

    Presenters will participate in a panel discussion featuring questions and answers from the audience. The program will last from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. with light refreshments following the presentations and discussion. It is directed to LA River activists, organizations and agencies. The goal of the event is to focus more attention on native fish and habitat restoration as part of the LA River program and the importance of the tributaries such as Tujunga Canyon and the Arroyo Seco to restoring the health of the river ecosystem.

Get Tickets

Arroyo Seco Foundation, 570 W. Avenue 26 #450, Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 405-7326
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Calendar Item: C&R fishing returns to the Bowtie

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Bowtie Field Day
Saturday Sept. 23
3–7 p.m.

Bowtie Project
2780 W. Casitas Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90039

Join Clockshop and California State Parks for an afternoon of outdoor activities along the Los Angeles River at the Bowtie Project. This free program is open to all ages, with activities and walks led by California State Parks rangers, Bowtie Project artists, naturalists and educators.

Activities

3–6 p.m.
• Catch & Release Fishing Demos
• Knot Tying Workshops
• Sculpting with Clay
• Plant Pressing Workshop
• Herbarium Demos
• Nature Walk

6–7 p.m.
• REI Raffle
• Campfire Program with S’mores
• Taco Plates Available for Purchase

Stay for an hour, or stay the whole day! Check out contemporary sculpture and historic rail yard landmarks amid thriving flora and fauna at the Bowtie Project.

Parking and restrooms on site. All activity materials provided.

 

Calendar Item: Find out the latest ‘trout scout’ news on Wednesday

Update: The Arroyo Seco Foundation has recently received a $50,000 grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to determine the best stream conditions for introducing trout, according to the Pasadena Star-News . 

Tim Brick, the foundation’s managing director, adds:

“We’re still look for trout, but the stream is below 1 cubic feet per second again. We need to identify the pools and resting spots where the trout are hiding. Probably Bear Canyon is the most likely spot. Anyone care to go on a trout scout adventure?”

His email is tim@arroyoseco.org.

Finally, to get a taste of what fishing used to be like here, check out historian Tom Tomlinson’s excellent book, ““Against the Currents: The Unlikely Story of the Southern California Steelhead.”

See you on the river, Jim Burns

Did the trout survive the drought?
What is the history of fish in the Arroyo?
What is the potential for native fish restoration?
What is the current restoration program?
Fish or Concrete — What’s the Future?

Wednesday, July 12, 7 p.m.

Donald Wright Auditorium
Pasadena Central Library, 285 E. Walnut St., Pasadena