Support a longer bridge over Trancas Creek for habitat restoration

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The existing bridge condition in January. Built in 1927 and supporting more than 22,000 vehicles a day, the bridge is now rated as “scour critical,” which means sediment is undermining its structure.  Alternative 3 would expand the bridge to the east into the green bank. (Courtesy Rosi Dagit)

 

Dear Fish Friends,

We have an amazing opportunity to have Caltrans repair the existing bridge over Trancas Creek with one that could actually support eventual lagoon restoration, development of a permanent ADA accessible trail from Zuma Beach to connect with upstream NPS trails and the Market complex, provide increased access for southern steelhead trout and habitat for endangered tidewater gobies.

One of the few proven ways to help recover steelhead is to provide them the habitat they need. Restoring Trancas lagoon requires a longer span bridge to be most effective. Here is a chance to make the great habitat upstream in Trancas Creek available for spawning again.

The Alternatives being considered include:

Alternative 1 No project – the existing bridge (84-foot span)  remains until it fails, which given the scour and tilt issues is inevitable.

Alternative 2 Short Bridge (120-foot span) essentially has the same scour and hydrologic problems as the existing bridge, and would require elevating the road bed 2.5 feet above current grade, with ramping along both north and southbound PCH to meet flood control standards, requires retaining walls and would effectively preclude any substantive restoration of the lagoon footprint.

Alternative 3 Long Bridge (240-foot span) provides the opportunity to not only build a bridge that would have a longer life span at the current road elevation, but also provide the opportunity for lagoon restoration and a safe trail connecting the beach upstream under PCH.

To review the documents, check out:

http://www.dot.ca.gov/d7/env-docs/docs/Trancas%20Creek%20Bridge%20Replacement%20Project%20Draft%20ISEA.pdf

Please send your letter by 5 June to: ron.kosinski@dot.ca.gov

Ron Kosinski, Deputy District Director

Caltrans District 7

Division of Environmental Planning

100 S. Main Street MS-16A

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Every letter helps!

Short and sweet will work.

Many thanks,

Rosi

Rosi Dagit is a Senior Conservation Biologist for the Resource Conservation District of the Santa Monica Mountains.

Calendar Item: Tenth Annual Frogtown Artwalk slated for Saturday, Aug. 13

image1 This year, Frogtown Artwalk, 4 p.m.-10 p.m., is dedicated to the vision of Lewis MacAdams of the Friends of the Los Angeles River (FoLAR), now in its 30th year of protecting and restoring the natural and historic heritage of the LA River. At the Artwalk hub, the Frogspot, an award ceremony at 6 p.m. will honor MacAdams for his work; CD13 councilman Mitch O’Farrell will also be thanked for his involvement in the Artwalk. See you on the river, Jim Burns

Major conservation organization awards philanthropist

 

Bacon

Louis Bacon (Courtesy TRCP)

(Press release) Philanthropist Louis Bacon, Sen. Martin Heinrich, and Sen. James Risch will be recognized at eighth annual awards dinner in April 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership is proud to announce the recipients of our eighth annual Capital Conservation Awards, to be presented on April 27, 2016, to three honorees building a legacy of support for fish and wildlife on Capitol Hill and across the country.

The TRCP’s 2016 Lifetime Conservation Achievement Award will go to Louis Bacon, a conservation philanthropist and founder of The Moore Charitable Foundation, Inc. As the president of MCF and chairman of its affiliate foundations, Bacon has spent more than two decades conserving threatened habitat, protecting open spaces, and safeguarding clean water through the support of more than 200 local, national, and international organizations. He was also instrumental in the founding of the Waterkeeper Alliance, an international organization of over 260 Waterkeeper organizations working across six continents to protect rivers, lakes, and coastal waterways.

Bacon has authorized conservation easements on more than 210,600 acres throughout the United States—including a parcel which is the largest such donation received by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and a critical step in the establishment of the Sangre de Cristo Conservation Area as the nation’s 558th unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Combined with additional donations authorized by Bacon of conservation easements on Tercio and Red River Ranches, these donations help form a landscape-scale conservation effort of 800,000 acres of protected lands stretching from Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado to northern New Mexico.

Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) and Sen. Jim Risch (R-Idaho) will be presented with the 2016 James D. Range Conservation Award—named after TRCP’s co-founder and conservation visionary—for their dedication to protecting what sportsmen value from both sides of the aisle in Congress.

An avid sportsman, Sen. Heinrich has championed conservation funding, clean water protections, and the expansion of recreational access to America’s public lands. He is the principal Democratic co-sponsor of the Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act, which would reauthorize key conservation programs and protect public access to hunting and fishing, and has staunchly opposed the transfer of national public lands to individual Western states.

Sen. Risch is a leader of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus and has co-sponsored legislation designed to reauthorize key conservation programs, put an end to fire borrowing, and promote renewable energy on public lands. As governor of Idaho, Risch worked with local government, tribes, conservation groups, and sportsmen to author a strong state roadless rule that protects national forests.

The TRCP’s gala event in April will bring together policy-makers, conservation advocates, and outdoor industry leaders at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

Fly fishers wanted for TV commercial

FLY FISHERS WANTED
CASTING TV COMMERCIAL FOR MAJOR TECH COMPANY!

We are for REAL FLY FISHERS (men and women, ages 20s to early 30s) to be cast in a television commercial for a major technology company.

Because this is a national commercial with residuals means the potential for HUGE PAY!

Open to both union and non-union, but you must be a REAL FLY FISHER with real experience fly fishing!!

You must be located in the Greater LA area.

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT IS THIS TUESDAY, Jan 12th, so please submit IMMEDIATELY!

Auditions: through Jan 12th (Tuesday!)
Callbacks: None- booking from tape
Shoot: Jan 20th-26th, 2016

TO SUBMIT:
Be sure to mention you heard about this from Jeff Gund at INFOLIST.com for priority consideration, and email ALL the information requested below IMMEDIATELY to:
info.goodpeoplecasting@gmail.com
Be sure to include:
1. Your name (first and last)
2. Contact phone number and email
3. A brief paragraph describing your experience as fly fisher (feel free to brag!)
4 Recent photos of yourself (jpg format please)
5. Recent photo(s) of you fishing (jpg format please)
6. Be sure to mention you heard about this from Jeff Gund at INFOLIST.com for priority consideration!

Quick Mends:LA River after El Nino’s first storm of the season

la-river-trash

LA Public Works removing debris caught by booms from Ballona Creek after a storm event. (Courtesy Algalita Marine Research Foundation)

 

This Los Angeles Times story, with accompanying photos and visuals, puts me in awe of the fish we have in the river. How do they ever return after an event such as this one? Best quote from the story:

“The namesake settlement of Los Angeles became the second city in California after San Jose, with a water ditch — the zanja madre —  diverting flow to the city.

The river, its tributaries and artesian wells made Los Angeles County one of the biggest cattle and food producing centers in the nation. Fishermen caught steelhead trout in the pools, and waterwheels ran flour mills in the currents.”

 

See you on the river, Jim Burns