New local mag lauds the LA River

From theLAnd, Vol. 1, Issue 1:

LARiver

… there’s beauty in the river — the way its brutalist structure creates harsh edges and shadows, the way nature manages to thrive in the soft bottom areas, too wild to be tamed by cement. Most importantly, there have always been people who use and inhabit this space, from the Tongva who built their civilization around the bountiful waterway to Los Angeles residents who used the river as their main source of water for decades. That is, until they found water elsewhere and the river’s unpredictable boundaries became a threat to the city’s growth.

See you on the river, Jim Burns

First big test of housing vs. LA River restoration

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At the Bowtie State Park: “Appreciate hard times, someday they’ll just be another chapter in your success story.” (Jim Burns)

From the Los Angeles Times:

Los Angeles’s twin challenges of building more housing while restoring its namesake waterway are clashing along a shady 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River between downtown and the hills of Griffith Park.

On a 7-acre parcel in that stretch, a developer wants to build the riverfront’s first major development, Casitas Lofts, a 419-unit mix of mostly upscale apartments, offices and restaurants bordering neighborhoods on the east side of the river, Glassell Park and Atwater Village.

But opponents — including many nearby residents, the influential nonprofit Friends of the Los Angeles River and the Natural Resources Defense Council — contend the development would disrupt habitat restoration efforts, trigger gentrification and erode the area’s allure.

Yurok Tribe declares personhood for Klamath River

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The Klamath River now has the legal status of personhood. (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

From High Country News: This summer, the Yurok Tribe declared rights of personhood for the Klamath River — likely the first to do so for a river in North America. A concept previously restricted to humans (and corporations), “rights of personhood” means, most simply, that an individual or entity has rights, and they’re now being extended to nonhumans. The Yurok’s resolution, passed by the tribal council in May, comes during another difficult season for the Klamath; over the past few years, low water flows have caused high rates of disease in salmon, and cancelled fishing seasons.

South Gate’s $20 million Urban Orchard Project could be local model for species recovery

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The Arroyo Chub is one of the native species that The City of South Gate and The Trust for Public Land will raise after the completion of the $20 million Urban Orchard Project. ( courtesy UC Davis)

Another sign of hope for the LA River, turning an abandoned lot into a fishery for arroyo chub and rainbow trout.

One question: Where will the trout go once they’ve been raised? The water temperature is way too hot to return them to the river. Here’s the full story from the Los Angeles Times.

The city of South Gate plans to transform a weedy and rutted field overlooking an industrialized stretch of the Los Angeles River into a sylvan retreat boasting a nursery for rare native fish that thrived before the explosive growth of Southern California after World War II.

The $20-million Urban Orchard Project is slated to sprout on 7 acres of undeveloped city property sandwiched between the 710 Freeway and the river and surrounded by electrical power-line towers, truck yards, mobile homes, manufacturing plants and some of the most densely populated neighborhoods in the state.

 

See you on the river, Jim Burns

Janna 47.151.36.197

Great article! I hope this is a success and makes other cites do similar projects long the shores of their urban waterways; bring nature back, the birds, the fish and the pants and improving our green spaces, is a win for everyone.