Tag: Environment

ASF hosts green forum for mayoral candidates in Pasadena

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The Arroyo Seco Foundation will host the Pasadena Mayoral Candidates Forum on the Environment to be held in the Donald Wright Auditorium of the Pasadena Central Library, 285 E. Walnut St. in Pasadena on Tuesday, January 14, 2020 from 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. The theme of the event will be “How Green Should Pasadena Be?” Topics to be covered will include climate change, the Arroyo Seco, trees and other issues of local concern.

The program will begin with a brief opening statement from each of the four candidates on their environmental record and views. The candidates include Jason Hardin, Victor Gordo, Major Williams and current Mayor Terry Tornek. Following the initial statements, there will be a panel of local environmental leaders who will ask questions of the candidates. The public will also be invited to ask questions of the candidates. The event will conclude at 8:30 pm.

The discussion is a timely event since the primary election for the Mayor’s race will be held on March 3, 2020.

“We are pleased that all four candidates have confirmed their participation,” said Tim Brick, Managing Director of the Arroyo Seco Foundation, “and look forward to a lively discussion of critical environmental concerns and solutions.”

Today the fly fishing community is coming together in support of Bristol Bay

I just ordered from Bob Marriott’s to support this important work. Here are the three retailers in California that you can use today to have a portion of your sale go toward it.

California
Lost Coast Outfitters, San Francisco, CA
Tahoe Fly Fishing Outfitters, South Lake Tahoe, CA
Bob Marriott’s Fly Fishing Store, Fullerton, CA

See you on the river, Jim Burns

Earth Quotes: Edward Abbey

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Edward Abbey (Courtesy of Milkweed Editions)

“One final paragraph of advice: do not burn yourselves out. Be as I am — a reluctant enthusiast … a part-time crusader, a half-hearted fanatic. Save the other half of yourselves and your lives for pleasure and adventure. It is not enough to fight for the land; it is even more important to enjoy it. While you can. While it’s still here. So get out there and hunt and fish and mess around with your friends, ramble out yonder and explore the forests, climb the mountains, bag the peaks, run the rivers, breathe deep of that yet sweet and lucid air, sit quietly for a while and contemplate the precious stillness, the lovely, mysterious, and awesome space. Enjoy yourselves, keep your brain in your head and your head firmly attached to the body, the body active and alive, and I promise you this much; I promise you this one sweet victory over our enemies, over those desk-bound men and women with their hearts in a safe deposit box, and their eyes hypnotized by desk calculators. I promise you this; You will outlive the bastards.”

Support a longer bridge over Trancas Creek for habitat restoration

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The existing bridge condition in January. Built in 1927 and supporting more than 22,000 vehicles a day, the bridge is now rated as “scour critical,” which means sediment is undermining its structure.  Alternative 3 would expand the bridge to the east into the green bank. (Courtesy Rosi Dagit)

 

Dear Fish Friends,

We have an amazing opportunity to have Caltrans repair the existing bridge over Trancas Creek with one that could actually support eventual lagoon restoration, development of a permanent ADA accessible trail from Zuma Beach to connect with upstream NPS trails and the Market complex, provide increased access for southern steelhead trout and habitat for endangered tidewater gobies.

One of the few proven ways to help recover steelhead is to provide them the habitat they need. Restoring Trancas lagoon requires a longer span bridge to be most effective. Here is a chance to make the great habitat upstream in Trancas Creek available for spawning again.

The Alternatives being considered include:

Alternative 1 No project – the existing bridge (84-foot span)  remains until it fails, which given the scour and tilt issues is inevitable.

Alternative 2 Short Bridge (120-foot span) essentially has the same scour and hydrologic problems as the existing bridge, and would require elevating the road bed 2.5 feet above current grade, with ramping along both north and southbound PCH to meet flood control standards, requires retaining walls and would effectively preclude any substantive restoration of the lagoon footprint.

Alternative 3 Long Bridge (240-foot span) provides the opportunity to not only build a bridge that would have a longer life span at the current road elevation, but also provide the opportunity for lagoon restoration and a safe trail connecting the beach upstream under PCH.

To review the documents, check out:

http://www.dot.ca.gov/d7/env-docs/docs/Trancas%20Creek%20Bridge%20Replacement%20Project%20Draft%20ISEA.pdf

Please send your letter by 5 June to: ron.kosinski@dot.ca.gov

Ron Kosinski, Deputy District Director

Caltrans District 7

Division of Environmental Planning

100 S. Main Street MS-16A

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Every letter helps!

Short and sweet will work.

Many thanks,

Rosi

Rosi Dagit is a Senior Conservation Biologist for the Resource Conservation District of the Santa Monica Mountains.

Endangered So. Cal. Steelhead dies before it can reproduce

 

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By Rosi Dagit

Guest Contributor

She was lying on her back on the bottom of a pool, pushed by the flow against a rock. Bruised, scales falling off, scrapes all over her body, she was barely breathing. Gently holding her face into the flow, she gasped for air and hung limply in my hands. I could feel her muscles twitch and contract, but she could not swim at all. When I let her go, she sank to the bottom on her back and rolled with the flow on her side, up against my feet, unable to orient herself.

At 23 inches, she was a full-grown anadromous steelhead that had fought her way upstream against the current in search of a place to spawn. The creek was wondrous after all the winter storms, with steady flows cascading over rocks, providing a background music calling her upstream to find a good place to lay her eggs.

For several minutes we stood and discussed what to do. She was clearly not going to recover and survive, but she was not quite dead yet. It was just heartbreaking to think of losing this fish, one of only four anadromous adults known to have returned to the creeks so far this year in all of Southern California.

What went wrong? How did she get so banged up? Was the flow too strong? Was she too old and tired, having waited too many years for the rains to come?

She died in my hands. I brought her battered body back to teach us and help us learn to tell her story. Her scales will tell us her age. Her DNA will give us insight into her ancestry. She was not one of our tagged fish, but from somewhere else. Only 18 eggs, an empty stomach. The promise of the future for southern steelhead took a big loss today.

Rosi Dagit is a Senior Conservation Biologist for the Resource Conservation District of the Santa Monica Mountains.

Editor’s Note: Dagit and the RCDSMM  have permits to monitor and handle these endangered fish. Only permitted biologists are allowed to handle them. There is a substantial fine per fish (around $25,000) for harassment or taking one from the water, if not permitted.