Tag: Los Angeles River

Calendar Item: Sign up for this weekend’s LA River clean up

UPDATE: Friends of the Los Angeles River was born in Northeast Los Angeles 30 years ago and the hometown came out like never before for this year’s Great Los Angeles River CleanUp!

More than 5,000 volunteers came and pulled an estimated 30-40 tons of trash from Los Feliz to Lincoln Heights last weekend.

It’s not over yet – next weekend the CleanUp moves to the Lower River for the final day of the CleanUp. This is your last chance to join the River movement at this year’s CleanUp.

 

Don’t miss the granddaddy clean up of them all! Register here.

CLEANUP

 

Quick Mends:LA River after El Nino’s first storm of the season

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LA Public Works removing debris caught by booms from Ballona Creek after a storm event. (Courtesy Algalita Marine Research Foundation)

 

This Los Angeles Times story, with accompanying photos and visuals, puts me in awe of the fish we have in the river. How do they ever return after an event such as this one? Best quote from the story:

“The namesake settlement of Los Angeles became the second city in California after San Jose, with a water ditch — the zanja madre —  diverting flow to the city.

The river, its tributaries and artesian wells made Los Angeles County one of the biggest cattle and food producing centers in the nation. Fishermen caught steelhead trout in the pools, and waterwheels ran flour mills in the currents.”

 

See you on the river, Jim Burns

Quick mends: Will El Nino be able to flush fish invaders from LA River?

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Keith Mosier nabs his first L.A. River carp. Oh, yeah! (Ken Lindsay)

A straight flush? That’s the topic environmental writer Louis Sahagun ponders in today’s LA Times, and the hypothesis being tested in this recent citizen science event: Can nonnative species survive in So Cal’s boom-or-bust water cycles?

For those of us who enjoy fishing them, the answer is “sure, hope so!” But as many of you can attest, the bass, also a nonnative, went away for many months following last winter’s storms.

See you on the river, Jim Burns